Erotica Writer INTERVIEW: Scarlet Darkwood

Bio: http://scarletdarkwood.com/about/

 

What lead to your choice to write?

I’ve always enjoyed writing since I was a young girl. I took creative writing in high school, and I loved it. But writing a novel had always intrigued me. I’m impressed by the way some people who just seem to have a knack for telling a story, creating interesting charters, and coming up with plots that make their story sizzle. I didn’t think I had the ability to even attempt such a thing. After putting some time and energy into learning some of the craft of writing, the time came when I suddenly wanted to dive in and give it a whirl. Voi-la, I birthed my first novel. The journey and self-discovery has been amazing.

 

Do your family and friends know you write erotica?  If so are they supportive?

Only my spouse, a cousin, and a few friends. They are supportive, but I have chosen to keep my writing in this category separate from my “real” life. I know my mother would be horrified, as she simply does not care for the subject matter of erotica. I think if my other friends and colleagues knew about it, they would definitely be surprised. To them, I’m just not that kind of girl! Since I’m not a full-time writer, I don’t need employers raising an eyebrow at what I do on my off-time.

 

Do you see writing as a career, either current or future? 

I would love to make a career of writing–anytime–the sooner the better. But I do see how this is so hard to accomplish. The problem I have right now is that I’m not an especially prolific writer, one who can push out book after book. I have to muddle through things and look at everything from all kinds of angles, so it takes me a little more time than it might take other authors. I find this frustrating because I keep hearing how important it is to have several pieces of work under your belt before you can even begin to think of being successful.

 

Do you have a message or theme you want to get across? Is that something that is in all of your work, or just a particular line/series/piece?

I don’t have a particular theme or message captured in my work. For the Pleasure House Tales, there is the theme of the asylum and the twist I give by making it an erotic place–or one side of it anyway. I have always been intrigued by asylums and what went on in them. They were such horrible places, and I couldn’t help but wonder what it would be like to create an asylum where the staff care

d about and indulged their admits (or patients, rather).

 

Where would you like to be 5 years from now?

I would like to be an entrepreneur, running my own business, and writing would definitely figure in there. I love being my own boss and taking control of my life. In this scenario, I want to be the dominant one, not the submissive.

 

What books have most influenced your life most?

Oddly enough, I adore the Anne of Green Gables series. Far from being erotic, the tales are sweet and wholesome, and the writing is incredibly beautiful. I’ve enjoyed the Castle of The Hidden Grotto series, which is erotica, by the way. The writing style and the stories win on both sides of the equation. The characters and world the author created are just amazing.

 

What was the best advice you have ever heard, read or been giving regarding writing?

Simply: Just write. One well-know author indicated that it was silly of someone to ask her about writing advice because all a writer had to do was simply write. I find that most people talk more about writing than actually sitting down to do it. What surprises me more is that I feel many “writers” are lazy, in that they don’t want to invest some time in learning the art and craft of writing and learning punctuation and grammar as well. They just seem to dive in with no idea of how to put a story together. When it’s suggested that they invest some time into taking a course in writing, they seem to blow off this important piece of advice. My learning some of this to start with helped me in getting a book out there to the public.

 

What book are you reading now?

I’m reading Defying Gravity, by Caroline Myss, which outlines all the spiritual graces and how to invoke them. I love reading books on spirituality because I always need work in finding my highest potential or trying to understand my own divinity. I like understanding how cosmic laws work and how we all are a part of that. On the flip side, I finally purchased a copy of Selena Kitt’s “Under Mr. Nolan’s Bed.” I’d heard that it was controversial enough for Amazon to pull it off their shelves. So I went to Barnes and Noble and purchas

ed a Nook copy. It was an interesting read, but the ending had a very unusual twist. And I love twists.

 

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Oddly enough, I usually don’t find myself necessarily favoring a particular author. I read a book based on the type of genre I enjoy as well as the subject matter. If that author happens to hook me enough and writes several books, I’ll most likely purchase other works of theirs.

 

What question have you always wanted to be asked in an interview? How would you answer that question?

Interesting question! Probably this one: “Does writing erotica make you feel like a sexaholic?” The answer: “Somewhat.” Let’s face it, when I write in this genre, I’m constantly thinking about the sex and how I can present this subject in a more interesting light. I’m trying to discover how I can weave it into an interesting, fun story. I still find it fascinating that someone can take the subject of sex and write about it for many, many pages, weaving it into a story that captures your attention.

 

Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing? (OR) What is the hardest part of writing for you?

The hardest part of writing is, again, being a prolific writer. I seem to have a hard time being creative and coming up with fabulous plots. I have to work hard at it. Some people just seem to do it so easily. Unfortunately, I’m not one of them. I spend a good part of my time looking at the different angles of a particular scene, and trying to pick which one would work the best.

 

Do you ever experience writer’s block? If so how do you get through it?

I do experience writer’s block, and I find myself at times struggling just to get simple sentences just the way I want them. Sometimes I just write out the closest thing I can to get to it, and then I come back later after I’ve thought through the situation more. Sometimes I just get quite, go lie down on my bed for a while, and really think about my scene and what I want to accomplish. The most fascina

Pleasure House by Scarlet Darkwood
Pleasure House by Scarlet Darkwood

ting thing I find is that just right before awakening from sleep, I get some of the most clear writing ideas.

 

How do you find inspiration?

I find inspiration from life, people, situations, and just riding through a new town or parts of a neighborhood I’ve never ridden through before. Sometimes I get inspiration from finding a piece of wrapped candy on the sidewalk. Many times viewing a beautiful tree or rolling hills can be inspirational. Things just come out of nowhere, then everywhere. I’ll tell you where I don’t get inspiration: from writing prompts. I hate those!

 

How do you keep the love of writing alive?

I keep thinking of the next thing I can write. I’m learning to keep notebooks on ideas and jotting down different character types, plot lines, and the like. I actually enjoy the feeling I get from being in the middle of writing a novel. It’s difficult to describe, but I like knowing in the back of my mind that I’m working on a project. I’ll be driving down the road and trying to work through a particular scene or trying to come up with a new chapter.

 

Have you learned anything from writing? What was it?

I’ve discovered that yes, I can put a story together from start to finish. I’ve learned to be more creative and how to work my way through tough spots. I’ve found that I can keep a secret! I mean, I haven’t shared with the world that I have written an erotica novel. I like keeping it as my own dirty little secret. So readers will only know my work through my author name.

 

What do you feel are your strong points? What about things you’re working to improve?

I’m very organized, dedicated, and determined. That helps me realize my dream and get my work done. I’m trying to improve my speed, coming up with the ability to put out a story faster and faster. My first book took me a year, so I’d like the companion novel to take at least half the time or less. As far as what I’m working on to improve: concentrate more on writing when I’m at the computer and stay off the Internet.

 

Do you have any advice for other writers?

My advice is to first learn the craft of writing and how to plot, create characters, and simply learn how to put a story together. Take some online courses, read some books–anything. My second piece of advice would be to learn punctuation, especially comma usage. Other than that, put your nose to the grindstone and just write. Don’t just talk about it: DO IT! The other thing I suggest is to not be so attached to your work that you can’t take suggestions from beta readers or editors. I love the challenge of writing most of all, so I don’t get too easily attached to the work. I’m simply trying to fulfill a challenge.

 

Do you write an outline before every book/story you write?

Not formally. If I’m having a hard time putting a timeline together or trying to figure out how I want the story to go, I will get a notebook and start jotting down characters and what I want them to do, as well as include ideas for scenes.

The problem is I don’t have a full complete story in my head at any given time, so I wouldn’t be able to create a full outline anyway.

 

How do you come up with characters that are not only real to you and your readers but continue to intrigue you through the life of their in-book/series time?

As I create the story and the characters, they seem to pop into my head, and from then on, they slowly begin to come alive as I build the story. It’s interesting because I did a blog posting about how totally unique my characters are to me. So much so that I cannot find any images of people who resemble the way the character looks in my mind’s eye. In Pleasure House, Daren is actually my favorite character, but no other reader ever points him out. So perhaps I missed the mark in making him a compelling character to others. That’s what I wonder. And sometimes, the main character may not always be my favorite, and the villain seem to be a favorite of others. Everyone notices Joe, though he didn’t figure much in the novel until near the end. The characters become real to me as I write about them, developing their personalities, their physical features, and their ways of thinking. They each have their own personal style.

 

What’s a typical working day like for you? When and where do you write? Do you set a daily/weekly writing goal?

Usually I write in the evenings at home or on the weekends in my place of business. Day jobs have a way of interfering with writing, and with the job I have now, I don’t even get the hour lunch break. Too bad, I really miss those.

 

What are your current projects? Can you share a little of your current work with us? (it will be linked to as a PDF)

I’m working on the companion novel to Pleasure House. The work is: Pleasure House: Tales From The Isolation Chambers. I’ll be addressing characters who reside on the “other side” of The House. In the first novel, the readers are exposed to the erotic side of The House. In the current novel, the good Dr. James has a project he wants to try, so he solicits the help of the characters in the first novel. For the first time, they are exposed to regular people who had the misfortune of ending up in an asylum–and on the other side of The House. They are forced to put their clinical skills to work and try to find ways to introduce their admits into a different world they’ve experienced so far. In this novel, some of the characters, such as Joe, will get more stage time. I’m having fun writing this companion novel.

Links:

Scarlet Darkwood Blog: http://www.scarletdarkwood.com

Works For Sale:  http://scarletdarkwood.com/for-sale/

I want to thank Scarlet for taking the time for this interview!

I hope you enjoyed this interview.  If you are an author and would like to be interviewed please contact me at ndpave@gmail.com or send me a direct message on Twitter (@nymphdupave).  Thanks!

Erotica Writer INTERVIEW: Cassandra Carr

BIO: Cassandra Carr is a multi-published, award-winning erotic romance writer with Ellora’s Cave, Siren, and Loose Id who lives in Western New York with her husband, Inspiration, and her daughter, Too Cute for Words. When not writing she enjoys watching hockey and hanging out on Twitter. Cassandra’s book Caught was recently named Best BDSM Book 2011 by LoveRomancesCafe.

Nymph Du Pave: What lead to your choice to write?

Cassandra Carr: Funny enough, getting laid off and deciding to have a baby. I know that’s not a real traditional route to take, but it worked for me.

NDP: What are your current projects? Can you share a little of your current work with us? (it will be linked to as a PDF)

CC: I’m currently working on the first book of a five-book series which revolves around IT geek heroes. I love geeks (I married one) and think they’re underrepresented in the romance market. 😉  Here’s a snippet – UNEDITED, as the book has not sold:

A knock sounded at the door and Keith rose to answer it. When the woman Michael assumed was Juliet stepped into the room he made a distinctly undignified gurgling sound. This gorgeous, elegant woman was their director of IT? He thanked the heavens for small favors when it appeared she hadn’t heard him. She glanced around and Michael took a few seconds to assess her.

Her brown, shiny hair hung to just below her ears, and even though her mouth was currently drawn into a thin line, it was obvious she had a beautiful set of lips that Michael could think of about a thousand uses for. Her gaze was cold, but an undeniable source of heat lurked in their depths, as if she was at once furious and also completely disapproving of SOS being there. She was wearing a snug red sweater and a slim black skirt with black high-heeled boots that lovingly wrapped around her calves, and she was currently tapping her foot in a staccato beat. A throat cleared beside him.

“Michael?” PJ prompted.

Shit. No doubt PJ had noticed his reaction to Juliet.

“Um…”

Fucking brilliant, man.

“Oh, for Pete’s sake,” Juliet snapped. She stepped forward and held out her hand. “Juliet Brun, director of IT.”

NDP: Do you see writing as a career, either current or future?

CC: It’s definitely my career now! I’m a full-time writer, or as full-time as you can be with a toddler at home part of the time. I fully intend to make this my life’s work.

NDP: Do you have a message or theme you want to get across? Is that something that is in all of your work, or just a particular line/series/piece?

CC: There are different themes in different pieces. Overall, love conquers all.

NDP: Where would you like to be 5 years from now?

CC: On a bestsellers’ list. But seriously, if I can make enough money from my writing to help send my daughter to college I’ll feel like my mission in life is complete.

NDP: What books have most influenced your life most?

CC: The Westing Game, when I was younger. It was a Newberry Award Winner in the late 1970’s (dating myself, eek!) and I read it until it fell apart. I still have a copy of it.

I also enjoy books like Pride and Prejudice.

NDP: What book are you reading now?

CC: Fifty Shades of Grey. I figure since it’s in my genre I should see what all the hype is about. I’m about halfway through it. I have all three of the trilogy but I’m not sure I’ll read them all since I have over 200 books on my to-be-read list.

NDP: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing? (OR) What is CC: the hardest part of writing for you?

CC: Productivity is by far my biggest challenge. I only have part-time childcare so when I do I really need to put words down on the screen. It’s hard to fly into productivity and stay there all day, though. I also write at night after my daughter has gone to bed, but I’m tired then and sometimes it’s a struggle to get up the energy to sit down and write a few thousand words. I do sprints with other writers on Twitter – that helps a lot!

NDP: Do you ever experience writer’s block? If so how do you get through it?

CC: Every writer does. Here’s my advice for beating writer’s block: keep writing. Don’t allow yourself to stop; you’ll lose all momentum and compound the problem. You will eventually write yourself out of writer’s block, so even if you have to re-work or delete part of what you did it’s better than nothing.

NDP: How do you find inspiration?

CC: Oh wow. Inspiration is everywhere! I am often inspired by one small kernel which turns into an entire book. In my release, Collision, the whole story was started with the idea of the King of Rodeo and the Ice Queen. The plot and characters grew entirely out of that.

NDP: How do you keep the love of writing alive?

CC: I keep selling books. 😉 Seriously, this is what I love to do, and when it gets hard I just look at my friends and family who are struggling in Corporate America. Do I want to change places with them? Hell no!

NDP: Have you learned anything from writing? What was it?

CC: You mean like life lessons? That you if you want something badly enough and work hard enough for it, combined with doing the proper research into how to do it, you will have a much greater likelihood of succeeding.

NDP: What do you feel are your strong points? What about things you’re working to improve?

CC: I’m told my sex scenes are my strong points, along with heroes my readers can fall in love with. My weaknesses? Hmm. Probably secondary plotting. I tend to keep a very tight focus on my hero and heroine. That’s okay in a shorter work, but in the longer works it’s a problem because you need subplots and secondary characters to keep the story moving.

NDP: Do you have any advice for other writers?

CC: Everyone has advice, and I’m no exception. 🙂 If you really want to be a writer, write. Finish that book. Don’t say you’re going to; actually do it. Lots of people WANT to be writers, but not very many really are.

NDP: Do you write an outline before every book/story you write?

CC: HAHAHAHAHA No. I’m a pantser, to the point that sometimes I end a chapter and literally have no idea what I’m going to write next. I oftentimes don’t know how a book is going to end. I’ll be typing along and cock my head. “That looks like a good place to finish.” The End. There, done.

NDP: How do you come up with characters that are not only real to you and your readers but continue to intrigue you through the life of their in-book/series time?

CC: I write characters I’d like to read about. It’s as simple as that.

NDP: What’s a typical working day like for you? When and where do you write? Do you set a daily/weekly writing goal?

CC: I don’t have a typical day since my childcare is somewhat in flux, but when I write I try to sit down at the computer for at least an hour at a time. I don’t always write during that entire hour, sometimes I check email and the like, but I try not to get up more than once an hour. I write mostly in the corner of my living room (remember that toddler I mentioned?) and at cafes if I need to leave the house. I don’t set writing goals. I think they’d stress me out. I’m pretty prolific so I don’t really need them either.

 

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I want to thank Cassandra for taking the time for this interview!  I hope you enjoyed reading it.

If you are an author and would like to be interviewed please contact me at ndpave@gmail.com or send me a direct message on Twitter (@nymphdupave).  Thanks.

Erotica/Romance Writer INTERVIEW: Rebecca Royce

Bio: (edited down for space, for the longer version visit Rebecca’s Amazon page!)  Rebecca is the mother of three adorable boys and is fortunate to be married to her best friend.  She’s in love with science fiction, fantasy, and the paranormal and tries to use all of these elements in her writing. She’s been told she’s a little bloodthirsty so she hopes that when you read her work you’ll enjoy the action packed ride that always ends in romance. Rebecca loves to write series because she loves to see characters develop over time and it always makes her happy to see her favorite characters make guest appearances in other books.

 

Nymph Du Pave: What lead to your choice to write?

Rebecca Royce: I was always an avid reader.  But, truthfully, I wrote my first book in fourth grade so I think I was always going to write.  My actual choice to seek publication came when I was pregnant with my second son.  Let’s blame the hormones.

 

NDP: What are your current projects? Can you share a little of your current work with us?

RR: Right now I’m working on two things. A stand-alone new story and Love Beyond Expectations, the fifth book in my Outsider series.

 

NDP: Do you see writing as a career, either current or future?

RR: Writing is my career. Officially. As of this year, it is not my hobby, its my job.

 

NDP: Do you have a message or theme you want to get across?

RR: No, I kind of just let the characters tell their stories.

 

NDP: Where would you like to be 5 years from now?

RR: I hope I’m still writing, telling stories people want to read, and reaching an even wider audience.

 

NDP: What books have most influenced your life most?

RR: In terms of writing…  Um, Steven King has a wonderful book on writing. I recommend all potential authors read it.

 

NDP: What was the best advice you have ever heard, read or been giving regarding writing?

RR: Treat it like your job. Write every day.

 

NDP: What book are you reading now?

RR: Shannon K. Butcher has a Sentinal series and I am reading one of them now.

 

NDP: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

RR: I love finding new authors. I think everyone should check out Flesh and Feathers by April Ffeifer and Danielle Hylton-Outland. Its co-authored, their first novel, and really exceptional.

 

NDP: What question have you always wanted to be asked in an interview? How would you answer that question?

RR: Oh my gosh. I’ve been asked so many questions.  Um. I guess no one has ever asked me what my favorite movie is.  I love movies. Really love them.  And my favorite movie of all time is The Usual Suspects.

 

NDP: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

RR: Every book has a new challenge for me. Sometimes it’s starting a book. Sometimes it’s the love scenes. Sometimes it’s the fight scenes. Sometimes its the end.

 

NDP: What is the hardest part of writing for you?

RR: Getting through whatever the tough part of that book is.

 

NDP: Do you ever experience writer’s block? If so how do you get through it?

RR: I’ve got a little right now. My critique partner suggested I just write something else.  And it worked beautifully.

 

NDP: How do you find inspiration?

RR: Inspiration comes all over the place for me.  Sometimes its just standing in line at the deli.

 

NDP: How do you keep the love of writing alive?

RR: My imagination is very active. I’m very lucky that it just keeps going.

 

NDP: Have you learned anything from writing? What was it?

RR: I’ve learned to trust myself, my instincts, and my own writing.

 

NDP: What do you feel are your strong points? What about things you’re working to improve?

RR: I’m told that dialogue and world building are strong for me. I’m always working on my craft, trying to not make the same mistakes from book to book.

 

NDP: Do you have any advice for other writers?

RR: The same advice I was given—write everyday.

 

NDP: Do you write an outline before every book/story you write?

RR: No. I’m usually about one chapter ahead of where I’m actually writing but not more than that.

 

NDP: What’s a typical working day like for you? When and where do you write? Do you set a daily/weekly writing goal?

RR: I try to write 3000 words a day.  I write as much as I can in between driving my children around.

 

You can find Rebecca Royce here on Twitter @rebeccaroyce

 

I want to thank Rebecca for taking the time for this interview!

I hope you enjoyed this interview.  If you are an author and would like to be interviewed please contact me at ndpave@gmail.com or send me a direct message on Twitter (@nymphdupave).  Thanks!

Erotica Writer INTERVIEW: Amanda Charvi

Bio: Amanda has been writing erotica since she was a teenager. She works full-time as an attorney in New York but her passion is providing erotica content of the highest quality. Amanda is working towards being the leader in stream of consciousness erotica.

Nymph Du Pave: What lead to your choice to write?

Amanda Chavri: I have to write. Ever since I was kid I always had stories going on in my head. My imagination is always running wild and I think I have to give credit to Disneyworld. After visiting 45 times I still want to go back and feel like a kid. I feel I need to write. The stories come to me and I need to get them down on paper and share them with the world. One of the first stories I began to write was an erotic story. It’s just in me. I have lots of ideas for non-erotica stories but right now I have to write what I am really passionate about and I am passionate about erotica.

NDP: What are your current projects? 

AC: Currently I am working on finishing Asian Girl Gone Bad (AGGB) which is part of my Girls Gone Bad Series. Indian Girl Gone Bad was the first novel length work I finished and I have been dying to get on with the series. However, the allure of writing short stories has been too powerful. Instead of putting in the time to build AGGB I have put my energy into developing short stories that turn me on.

NDP: Do you see writing as a career, either current or future?

AC: I see it as a career. I want to keep improving my work and expanding what I am doing. I have no schedule. I have no set goal. I just know that I want to put my art out there for the world to see. I think realistically it won’t be a career until a few years down the line. I need to keep improving my craft and getting titles up to support a fulltime writing career.

NDP: Do you have a message or theme you want to get across?

AC: I don’t have any set message in my stories. I do like to inspire people. I like to help people perhaps see that they can do things. We are all artists. We have forgotten how to dream, build, think, and create art. We did all the time as children but eventually school beat it out of us and started to make us good little soldiers in the classroom.

In my current erotica work there is no real message or theme. I simply want the reader to get off. I want the reader to be shocked and titillated reading the words on the page. I want them to think about things they may not have thought about before. I want the dialogue to hit the person in the face and make them think to themselves, “That is fucked up.” I love the word play between my characters. I love humiliation and degradation when it comes to sex.

NDP: Is that something that is in all of your work, or just a particular line/series/piece?

AC: I try and make all my work shocking. I want it to be different. I want readers to think it’s all fresh and new which it is. I want to keep evolving.

NDP: Where would you like to be 5 years from now?

AC: Five years from now I would like to be writing for a living and doing attorney work as a hobbie. I’d like to have many titles up across multiple genres. I would like to be writing out of Miami, Florida. I love Miami. I love New York too but I love the colors and life of Miami.

NDP: What books have most influenced your life most?

AC: Romeo and Juliet is a fucking dessert to me. The words just drive me insane in how spectacular they are. I want to put words together like that. That’s a top book for me.

Fight Club had a great influence on me.

1776 is the best book I have ever read. I even bought a special edition copy that comes with maps and letters that were featured in the book.

Benjamin Franklin is another book I adore.

Count of Monte Cristo was an adventure.

Harry Potter for was a big influence. [J. K. Rowling] creates a world you want to live in.

But to actually answer the question I think Fight Club has influenced me a lot and was the biggest influence. Why does anything have to be a certain way? Let the chips fall as they may. Chuck really influenced my thinking in general.

The Four Hour Work Week really changed my life. Three weeks after reading that book I quit a terrible job I was in. From there it has been an amazing ride! I got a better job and then started to self pub since my stress was dramatically lower.

NDP: What was the best advice you have ever heard, read or been giving regarding writing?

AC: Just write. I would credit Konrath with that. I read his blog in a weird order. I started with the new stuff, went to the old, then to the middle, then to the beginning and finally I read through comments! I was all over the place. But the best thing he said was just write. I couldn’t find a quote exactly but I’m sure it’s there. I don’t want to write X and then promote X. I want to write X tell the world and then write Y. There will never be a Z.

I like to take some advice I learned in undergrad and apply it to writing and the writing business. A fellow student once told me how she doesn’t listen to other students’s questions. She said it confused her more than she already was or would confuse her when she wasn’t. I never forgot that. How I apply that to writing is that I simply just write. Today people hate adverbs. Tomorrow they will love them. Today people don’t like straight quotes, tomorrow it will be curly. I am positive most people don’t know anything including myself. Do what works for you. Do what you love. Don’t stay on discussion boards too long. They all become bitter boards.

NDP: What book are you reading now?

AC: I am currently reading for the second time, Lynchpin by Seth Godin. I’m starting a new job soon and I want to remember things I picked up the first time I read it.

NDP: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

AC: Jason Jaxx has grasped my interest because of his tenacity and energy. Sometimes you’re having a bad day and you see Jason throwing out a positive tweet and it instantly picks you up. That’s important. It’s important to stay positive and remember life can always be worse. We have good [times] sometimes and we forget that.

NDP: What is the hardest part of writing for you?

AC: The hardest part is sitting down and getting to work. I love what I do. When I am at work all I want to do is get home and write. When I get home all I want to do is sleep! The hardest part is sitting down and writing and the next hardest part is rereading what I have already written. It’s hard to pick up your own mistakes. It’s hard to go through and make sure you aren’t missing something. It is all worth it but to me those are the hard parts.

NDP:Do you ever experience writer’s block?

AC: I do not but that’s not a fair answer. I sometimes sit down and force myself to write. But I also don’t sit down to write until something is laid out in my head. I’ve done that my whole life. When I had to write a paper or email I think it out first. I outline in my head. And since I am not sitting down until it is all mapped out (more or less) I don’t experience writer’s block. If I had to sit down everyday and write than I am sure I would get blocked. However, I do believe as I’ve heard others say that engineers and firemen etc, never get engineering block. Everything is always easier said than done.

NDP: How do you find inspiration?

AC: For my erotica I find inspiration simply in what turns me on. If I find myself going to the same video to finally finish my marathon of porn watching then I know that’s what I want to write about. For nonerotica the ideas I have just jump into my head. I get inspiration on vacation a lot. I have no idea why. Maybe it’s because your work mind is shut off, I am not sure. But several of my ideas have come to me while I was on vacation and while watching other work. Sometimes I see something I feel I can improve and create my own world for my characters to play in.

NDP: How do you keep the love of writing alive?

AC: I always have to write a funny Facebook comment or something on Twitter. My invitations to parties are known for being really long and full of unimportant information that hooks the reader. I keep my love of writing alive by not writing as if it’s a job. I don’t write because it’s Tuesday etc. I don’t put goals up for myself. That works for me. I learned a bit about that from the Zen Habits blog. Goals work for some people and they don’t for others. I love this. I need to do what works for me. What works for me is not writing every single day. And I don’t take myself too seriously. I am not looking to polish sentences into nothing. Aside from obvious mistakes and proofreading, noone can tell me something should be changed.

NDP: Have you learned anything from writing? What was it?

AC: I’ve learned I am an artist. I have learned there is a hurricane inside me that needs to get out. When I look at important events in my life it usually had to do with something I wrote. I’ve always been a writer. I’ve always expressed myself best through writing but it wasn’t until I uploaded on Amazon that I realized I am an indeed an artist. Sure, I’ve written a title called Occupy My Ass, but it’s art. It’s my art.

NDP: What do you feel are your strong points? What about things you’re working to improve?

AC: My strong points are that I get inside my characters heads. You feel what the person is feeling. My best quality in the outside world is building relationships. I think I build relationships between my characters and the reader.

I want to improve my output of longer works. I am sure I can work on technique as well but right now I need to get out more longer works for my fans.

NDP: Do you write an outline before every book/story you write?

AC: I do not outline but I have been writing short stories mostly. I think outlining is important and it depends on the individual. I do not outline but I think in the future I will.

NDP: What’s a typical working day like for you? When and where do you write? Do you set a daily/weekly writing goal?

AC: I work as an attorney so my day changes constantly. I usually write at home with ear plugs and ear muffs on. I look ridiculous. Sometimes I write in the library but mostly at home. I do not set a goal. I just try to write when it comes to me and when it feels its been a while since I got a work up on Amazon. I don’t like to put additional stress on myself with goals but to each their own.

NDP: Do you have any advice for other writers?

AC: I give this advice for almost everything. Fuck everyone. No one can tell you you can’t do something. NIKE- Just Do It. Let the market tell you you are wrong. Some people think Twilight sucks but that didn’t stop it from selling. Same with Dan Brown and Rowling. Fuck everyone. Most people only know from their own experience and there is nothing wrong with that. Take the good leave the rest and just do it. Write. Remember that part in Jerry Maguire when he gets the Mission Statement photocopied and the clerk says, “That’s how you become great man, you hang your balls out there.” Sometimes you gotta show the world your vagina (or balls) and let the world decide.

Amazon Author Central Page: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_tc_2_0?rh=i%3Astripbooks%2Ck%3AAmanda+Charvi&keywords=Amanda+Charvi&ie=UTF8&qid=1334157454&sr=1-2-ent&field-contributor_id=B006WGUECU

Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/AmandaCharvi

I want to thank Amanda for taking the time for this interview!  I hope you enjoyed reading it.

If you are an author and would like to be interviewed please contact me at ndpave@gmail.com or send me a direct message on Twitter (@nymphdupave).  Thanks.

Erotica Writer INTERVIEW: Liia Ann White

Bio: http://www.liiaannwhite.com/bio/

 

Nymph Du Pave: What inspired you to write?

Liia Ann: I’ve been writing on and off since I was about 12. I have nightmares and strange dreams every night, whic
h give me all sorts of different ideas to write, it just seems to come naturally to me.

NDP: What are your current projects?

LA: I’m currently concentrating on my Young Adult Urban Fantasy story, which I’ve been doing for quite some time. Then every now and then I pick up the sequel to my debut UF novel, Elora’s Match.

 

NDP: Do you see writing as a career?

LA: Definitely. Not only that, it’s my dream career and I’m determined to make it work.

 

NDP: Do you have a message or theme you want to get across?  Is that something that is in all of your work, or just a particular line?

LA: I like to write what I know, so I make sure at least one of my main characters are Australian. I also get across a message of tolerance and love for animals. A lot of my characters are vegan as well, though not in a preachy ‘don’t eat animal product’ way, just in a ‘this is my personal choice’ way, if that makes sense.

 

NDP: What is the hardest part of writing?

LA: Writer’s block! Wait, no – overcoming writer’s block LoL I have a terrible time coming to terms with the fact that there’s not much I can do about it but sick back and wait for my Muse to return. And when she does, she’s always out gunsablazing!

 

NDP: What do you feel are your strong points?  What about things you’re working to improve?

LA: I’ve always been a great speller, does that count? Since I was a little kid.

A definite strong point for me is ‘special’ scenes, you know the ones where people in love participate in that act. Sex LOL Yeah, I have a lot of fun writing those and the majority of them write themselves, just flowing from my fingertips. I’ve had a lot of readers compliment me on the way I write them so well they can feel the emotions my characters feel – that always makes my day.

I’m currently working on not being quite so ‘wordy’. Something that could be written in 500 words, I have a tendency to use 1000 words for. So, that’s something I’m always working to improve.

 

NDP: How do you find inspiration?

LA: My dreams and nightmares keep me inspired. I have that many ideas written down, I’ll be writing for decades to get them all done. If I could, I’d write horror, I have some doozy ideas for horror stories!

 

NDP:  How do you keep the love of writing alive?

LA: By remembering that it’s not the most important thing in the world. If I put too much pressure on myself to write I tend to either write absolute crap, or just sit there staring at a blank screen for hours. I remind myself that I’m doing this because I love it. Not because I feel I have to.

 

NDP: Do you have any advice for other writers?

LA: Never be afraid to ask for help. Listen to helpful advice more experience writers give you. If possible, find a mentor or critique partner with experience. And don’t write something you don’t love – chances are if you don’t love it, readers won’t either.

 

NDP: Do you write an outline before every book/story you write?

LA: I tend to write a basic plot out, but the characters usually have a way of changing bits and pieces as I write. Damn characters have minds of their own!

 

NDP: Where would you like to be 5 years from now?

LA: 5 years from now? I’d like to be a hugely successful best selling author. The kind where everything I touch turns to gold 😉

In all seriousness though, I want to be successful in my own right, have a few series’ that I’m working on currently finished and in the midst of publishing and just continuing to write what I love and getting it published.

 

NDP: What books have most influenced your life most?

LA: Hmmmm… Quite a few have made me think ‘Wow. That’s the kind of writer I want to be.’ But R L Stine’s books Goodnight Kiss 1 and 2 started my true love affair with reading and writing paranormal. I just love the way you can play around with paranormal characters, even create a new species as I did and it’s always fun to read about.

 

NDP: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

LA: Rebecca Royce ( @RebeccaRoyce ), my critique partner. Without her, I would have gone a mad(-der) a long time ago. She corrects my errors, points out plot holes and is constantly telling me what works and what doesn’t, reassuring me when I have moments of doubt.

She’s the best critique partner I could ever have hoped for and such a valued friend. I kinda love that woman to pieces.

 

NDP: What book are you reading now?

LA: I’m currently reading both Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins and Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare. I’ve been waiting to read these both for a while, so I’m forcing myself to have some downtime each day and read a bit of either. I usually read 1-3 books at a time. Like my writing, it depends what mood I’m in as to what I read.

 

Contact info for Liia: http://www.liiaannwhite.com/contact/

 

I want to thank Liia for taking the time for this interview!

I hope you enjoyed this interview.  If you are an author and would like to be interviewed please contact me at ndpave@gmail.com or send me a direct message on Twitter (@nymphdupave).  Thanks!

Erotica Writer INTERVIEW: Jason Jaxx

Bio:

Jason Jaxx is an author of erotica, starting out on the journey of self-publishing. An avid reader, music lover and geek, he is, obviously, a fan of erotica and adult-themed entertainment. He is happily married to a beautiful woman who, while sharing his belief that fantasy is essential to a healthy sex life, does not know about his writing. Holding a stressful job that offers no creative outlet, he views writing as a welcome release and challenges himself to explore different themes and styles.

He does not enjoy writing about himself in the third person.

 

Nymph Du Pave: What inspired you to write?

Jason Jaxx: I have always loved reading and writing was just a natural extension of that. I wrote short stories and started several novels but never seriously considered it as anything more than a hobby.

Favorite authors include Thomas Pynchon, Jonathon Franzen, Stephen King and Alan Moore.

My love (some might say obsession) for music led to me contributing reviews to fanzines and music magazines. (I consider music journalism to be a huge inspiration and an underrated form of literature – to write about something as esoteric and subjective as music in such a way as to influence and inspire the reader is a real skill)

Writing erotica was inspired by boredom and frustration at work and the fantasies I found myself indulging in. I contribute

d several short pieces to various sites with varying degrees of (generally favorable) feedback until I eventually got up the nerve to publish my first novella ‘A Night On The Town‘ on Smashwords. That proved to be a life changing moment.

 

NDP: What are your current projects?

JJ: Seducing Stephanie‘ (The MILF Files Book 3) – the latest in my series starring Jennifer, a mature woman, who embarks upon a sexual voyage of discovery with her son’s best friend.

The Medallion‘ – an erotic thriller about an amulet that bestows the wearer with mystical sexual abilities.

I’m also writing some non-erotic stuff that I may publish under a different name.

 

NDP: Do you see writing as a career?

JJ: Not yet. I love doing it and at the moment it is so incredibly rewarding from a creative perspective that financial gain is not a motivating factor. Of course, I would love to get paid to write full time but feel I still have so much to learn and improve on.

 

NDP: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

JJ: Sure – I have included the first chapter of The Medallion– it’s still a work in progress but I would appreciate any comments.  (BLOG OWNER NOTE: This download is of an adult nature.  By downloading and reading it you are acknowledging you are of age in your country to do so and are following all appropriate laws).

 

NDP: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

JJ: I love writing erotica but I always find myself writing long, detailed passages about sex which means I don’t always get the chance to flesh out characters and plot lines. The darn sex just keeps getting in the way! I realize that this isn’t really a problem with men’s erotica but nothing I have published so far has much of a plot beyond people get together and have sex.

The Medallion‘ will hopefully see a bit more in the way of plot and characterization (although the first chapter may not be the best indication of that). The (unplanned) ongoing nature of ‘The MILF Files’ is also allowing me to explore and develop the lead characters beyond the initial ‘fuck & suck‘ short story that started it off.

 

NDP: What is the hardest part of writing?

JJ: Finding the time to sit down and write uninterrupted.

Keeping the erotic stuff a secret.

Coming up with different words for ‘penis’.

 

NDP: Have you learned anything from writing? What was it?

JJ: I’ve learnt that I can write which was nice and that there are people out there that enjoy what I write which is even nicer.

I also found that characters can sometimes take you in different directions from which you originally intended for them which I find fascinating

 

NDP: What do you feel are your strong points? What about things you’re working to improve?

JJ: I feel that dialogue and vivid descriptions of sexual acts are my strong points (which are handy for my chosen genre).

As a novice author, I am aware that there is always room for improving my overall abilities as a story teller – I try and challenge myself to write from different perspectives or try out different voices.

Editing and grammar are my nemesis. I reread and double check everything I’ve written but something always seems to slip through! I am constantly reminded that there is so much I don’t know or have forgotten.

 

NDP: How do you find inspiration?

JJ: Inspiration comes from several places. Movies, TV and people watching can inspire specific scenarios or ideas for characters.

For the sex scenes, I tend to write about what turns me on. Being a guy that’s pretty much anything but I do try to fully explore a particular scenario or setting. Some of it is based loosely on real life events.

A Night On the Town‘ started with a short fantasy I wrote about going out with my wife and getting orally pleasured on the way. I posted it and thought that was that but I got a few comments asking for the next part. I added further chapters, trying to raise the depravity stakes with each one until it basically turned into two people out of their heads on drugs, fucking each other mindlessly.

Others like Mom Is A Slut‘ basically come from me getting an idea, sitting down and just writing out the scenario as it plays in my head.

 

NDP: How do you keep the love of writing alive?

JJ: The creative outlet is provides is enough to keep me going at the moment. . I love the idea that I don’t always know exactly how a scene or chapter will play out until I start writing it.

The nice thing for me about writing erotica is that it is an end in itself. It’s like I can create my own porn which sounds crude but it really motivates me to keep on writing. I like the idea of creating something that turns me and (hopefully) others on.

 

NDP: Do you ever experience writer’s block? If so how do you get through it?

JJ: At the moment, I have loads of ideas and possible storylines in my head so I don’t have an issue with not knowing where my next book is going to come from.

However, I often find myself stuck on a particular scene or piece of dialogue where I’m not sure how to proceed. When this happens I switch to another book, jump to another part of the story or do a bit of editing until something clicks and I can get unstuck. I also find that driving while listening to music is a great facilitator in coming up with ideas or resolutions.

 

NDP: Do you have any advice for other writers?

JJ: As a novice author with (extremely) modest sales, the best advice I can give is:

  • Don’t be afraid to put your work out there. I found Smashwords to be the ideal place to start off. Read their style guide, follow it and publish your work.
  • Make sure you edit your work.
  • Then edit it again.
  • Use Twitter and other social networks to get in touch with other writers and readers.
  • Write for yourself
  • Negative criticism is hard but if it is constructive, try and take it to heart and address it. My editing skills are often called into question and it makes me more determined then ever to improve them.

 

NDP: Do you write an outline before every book/story you write?

JJ: Not really. I have a basic outline in my head of where I want the overall story to go. I then break it up into chapters and jot down the story elements I want to hit in each one. I then write a rough draft of the chapter before going back and tightening it up. I often end up going in directions I had never planned on and since I enjoy this spontaneity, I try not to plot everything out too carefully beforehand. Once again, erotica is a wonderful medium in that it allows for this fluidity. As long as you stay true to your characters, you can take them wherever your imagination wants them to go.

 

NDP: What’s a typical working day like for you? When and where do you write? Do you set a daily/weekly writing goal?

JJ: I aim to write a little bit each day. I usually get some rough outlines done in the morning before I head off to work. During lunch or quiet moments during the day I expand on what I’ve done and then try do some editing in the evening. This, of course, is all dependent on how busy I am at work or with family commitments. Keeping my activities secret from everyone also adds a level of difficulty when trying to allocate time.

My goal is to get in about 500-1000 words a day, not all of which ends up being published but I feel I need to strengthen my writing ‘muscles’ and the only way to do that, is to write.

 

NDP: Where would you like to be 5 years from now?

JJ: Alive and happy surrounded by family and friends

 

NDP: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

JJ: I don’t know about mentor but Amanda Charvi (@AmandaCharvi) is definitely my inspiration and guide for my first awkward steps in publishing – her blog (amandacharvi.blogspot.com) literally inspired me to publish on Smashwords. She seemed to be facing the same doubts and fears that I was and just pushed through them. I asked her a few questions on Twitter and she generously sent me an awesome email that was incredibly helpful and contained several informative links. She has since posted a version of this on her site. It really was the spark that I needed to set me off on the journey of self-publishing. Thanks again Amanda!

 

NDP: What question have you always wanted to be asked in an interview? How would you answer that question?

JJ: “Would you like to do an interview?”

I would and thank you for giving a fledging author this opportunity.

 

 

Email: radiomancer@hotmail.com

Twitter: http://twitter.com/jasonjaxx

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=768939250

Tumblr: jasonjaxx.tumblr.com (WARNING: Contains graphic sexual images)

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/author/jasonjaxx

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/jasonjaxx

 

 

I want to thank Jason for taking the time for this interview!

I hope you enjoyed this interview.  If you are an author and would like to be interviewed please contact me at ndpave@gmail.com or send me a direct message on Twitter (@nymphdupave).  Thanks!

So close and yet… no boom for Corrine!! Also, intervew talk!

99.03% close to finishing my word count and I stop!  Lol.  Still, I did get just over the minimum 500 word count per day and I have work from the day job that I’ve got to get out.  So I had to stop.  But Corrine is about to get a thorough pounding.  Whew!  The thing with BDSM is there is so much drawing out of lust.  The point is ecstasy, to keep that feeling, to keep the arousal until the perfect time to conclude, and even upon finishing, you’re setting up for the next go ’round.  It’s lovely to write.

I have set up Tuesdays as my interview days.  I’m looking towards having interviews every two weeks with different authors, new and old, all hopefully in the Erotica/Romance genre.  My first two are Jason Jaxx and Liia Ann White.

I plan on having writers sharing inspiration, how they commit daily to writing, some of their work as well as where you can follow their blogs or facebook pages.

I am really looking forward to getting to know more and more Erotica writers out there!